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EERO

Summertime – and the devices go outdoors.

And then you get dropped from your WiFi router.

Or maybe you have a house like mine, with wire mesh in the walls rather than lathe so you get inconsistent coverage in various places in the house – even dead zones.

Or you’ve got high demand at various times of the day or evening.

If you’re a family that requires a lot of WiFi horsepower, eero may just be what you’re looking for!

Why didn’t somebody think of this one earlier? Multiple router points – as many as you need, for full house coverage.

I’m testing the eero, a multiple point routing device that connects to your modem and replaces your router or your range extenders (I tried one of those, too, with disappointing results).

Essentially, an eero for every 1000 square feet —so 2-3 for a typical home— is all you need. You plug in the first one, and once it’s recognized (less than 5 minutes), you use your mobile phone (on data, that is to say, off your network) to set up an eero network. Once that’s done, you keep adding devices —as many as you’ve purchased and need to cover  your home, patio, pool area— anyplace where you would commonly use your wireless devices.

eero will automatically update firmware, and allows for  Gigabit WiFi speed, with advanced settings to allow you to configure DHCP, NAT, VPN pas through, DNS, UPnP, port forwarding, static IP – even parental controls.

And if you have Alexa —that wonder device that you can chat with, that will take notes, answer questions, turn on your favorite music— essentially, most everything but clean the house (though can it be long before it connects with Roomba?) – eero can handle Alexa, as well.

The eero system is a multiple point routing device that connects to your modem and replaces your router or your range extenders.

For my house, I probably shouldn’t need the three that typically come with the basic system, but given my additional challenges with the walls, I did have to do a little fiddling to get it set up so that each device communicated properly. Believe it or not, my access point for my modem is “outside” the house (technically, on an enclosed “sunroom,” but there is an exterior wall between it and the rest of the house. So the second eero had to go somewhere visible (no walls) to the first (the one connected to the modem). But once that hurdle was leapt, the rest was easy.

Thus far, it has handled every challenge thrown at it by multiple computers, phones, tablets, a Kindle Firestick and an Apple TV – usually with at least three or four of them operating at the same time.

There are competitive products on the market, and eero isn’t cheap (about $400 for the three unit system), but if you’re a family that requires a lot of WiFi horsepower, this may just be what you’re looking for!

Nancy Roberts
Writer, voice over artist, information achitect, very curious person.